Example Screeners

Finbox users have used our Stock Screener to created thousands of interesting screens. We believe it's easiest to learn how to screener by reviewing a few examples. Please find some illustrative example screeners below:

Asset Class Focus

These example screeners should capture the essence of these categories based on commonly used definitions that you can customize as you see fit

  • Value Screener: Profitable companies that may be trading below intrinsic value. Example
  • Core Screener: Profitable, low debt companies with positive high free cash flows and roe. Example
  • Growth Screener: The label is generally given to companies growing quickly but may not be profitable or barely profitable. Example
  • Momentum Screener: Stocks with positive returns over various intervals. Example
  • Geographic Focus

    Want to focus just on companies operating in a specific country? You can use the operating region or operating country filters, as depicted below. On the other hand, If you want to screen for companies trading in a specif region or stock exchange, you can use our trading region or stock exchange filters.

    Miscellaneous

    • Low EV/EBITDA: According to James O'Shaughnessy's research, stocks with a low Enterprise value to EBITDA widely outperform the market. We discuss everything in detail in this article
    • Rule Of 40: A stock screener to pick the best SaaS companies. You can read more in this article.
    • James Montier C-Score: The Montier C-Score is a financial indicator designed by James Montier to evaluate the likelihood a company is manipulating its earnings. In his 2008 paper, James Montier shows that stocks with high C-scores underperform the market by around 8% p.a. and 5% p.a. in the US and Europe respectively (over the period 1993-2003). We discuss everything in detail in this article.
    • Sloan Ratio: A financial indicator designed by a former University of Michigan researcher, Richard Sloan, to evaluate the earnings quality of a business. In his research, Sloan demonstrates that businesses with a high accrual ratio significantly underperform businesses with a low accrual ratio. You can learn all about that in this article.
    • Piotroski F-Score: A financial indicator designed by accounting professor Joseph Piotroski to evaluate the financial strength of a business based on its profitability, leverage, liquidity, source of funds, and operating efficiency. In his research, he shows that using its score to pick only financially strong companies among those with a low P/B ratio increased the mean return by 7.5% annually. You can read more in this article.
    • Dogs Of The Dow: A popular investment strategy published in 1991 by Michael B. O'Higgins that consists of buying the ten (10) stocks of the Dow Jones Index with the highest dividend yield and rebalance the portfolio annually. You can find more details on the strategy's performance and backtest in this article.
    • Founder-Led Companies: Bain & Company's in-depth study found an index of S&P 500 companies in which the founder remained deeply involved "performed 3.1 times better" over the 15 years ranging from 1999 to 2014. Learn how to screen for founder-led companies and outperform the market in this article
    • High Shareholder Yield: By investing in a portfolio of stocks with the highest shareholder yield between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2016, you would have obtained an average excess return of 5.63%, beating the market to a large extent. We discuss everything in detail in this article.
    • Beneish M-Score: A statistical model to spot companies that are manipulating earnings. You can learn all about that in this article
    • Momentum: According to James O'Shaughnessy's research, stocks with the best 6-month momentum widely outperform the market in the 83-years backtest period between 1926 and 2009. You can read more in this article.
    • Trending Value: A strategy developed by James O' Shaughnessy and published in his famous book What Works On Wall Street. By investing in this strategy from January 1, 1964, to December 31, 2009, you would have obtained a compounded annual return of 21.19%—52 times the market return. We discuss everything in detail in this article
    • High Asset Turnover: According to research carried out by James O'Shaughnessy, investing in companies with a high Asset Turnover leads to outperforming the market. You can learn all about that in this article.
    • High Earnings Yield: According to research carried out by James O'Shaughnessy, investing in companies with a high Earnings Yield leads to outperforming the market. You can learn all about that in this article.
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